Prizes

The NZPSA awards 4 annual prizes (see below for details on how to apply):

  1. A Postgraduate Conference Prize for the best paper in the field of Aotearoa/New Zealand domestic politics.
  2. A Postgraduate Conference Prize in any other field of political studies.
  3. An undergraduate prize for the best essay submitted in a course on Aotearoa/New Zealand politics in a New Zealand University.
  4. An undergraduate prize for the best essay on Māori Politics submitted in a course at any Aotearoa/New Zealand University.

All prize winners will be announced at the Annual Dinner at the NZPSA Conference in December and will be recorded on this page. 

NEW ZEALAND POLITICS POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE PAPER PRIZE

Details

This prize originated in 2009 due to the generosity of Raymond Miller and from 2015 it will continue due to Janine Hayward’s generosity as the new editor of New Zealand Government and Politics (OUP). It is funded from the book’s royalties. A prize of $500 is awarded each year for the best postgraduate paper at the NZPSA conference in the field of New Zealand domestic politics.

The Convenor of the NZPSA Aotearoa/New Zealand Politics Network will appoint a panel of judges including a representative from the University of Auckland as the administrator of the prize. When either Raymond Miller or Janine Hayward are available, they will be included as members of the judging panel. The panel’s decision will be final. The prize is intended to be received by only one student, but it can be shared by one or more students on the recommendation of the panel.

To apply:

Those interested must provide via email an electronic file in word that includes the title of the paper, an abstract, paper and the author’s name and affliation, along with evidence that the paper has been accepted by the NZPSA Conference organisers. Please email these documents by Monday 19 October 2015 to the Convenor of the Aotearoa/New Zealand Politics Network, Professor Jack Vowles: jack.vowles@vuw.ac.nz.

Note that dissertations are not accepted. Papers should be presented at the conference in the year of submission, be approximately 6000 words and will not be accepted if they are over 8000 words excluding the abstract, references and tables. Papers can be co-authored with other students, but they must be fully the work of the student(s) making the submission: papers co-authored with supervisors or other staff members are excluded from consideration.

Winners:

2014: Joanne Waitoa (Institute of Development Studies, Massey University): “The Role of Social Media in Māori Political Engagement”

2013: Lara M. Greaves (Department of Psychology, University of Auckland): “Profiling the Fence-Sitters in New Zealand Elections: A Latent Class Model Identifying Distinct Voting Blocs”

2012: Juana Diesing (Department of Politics, University of Otago): “Does social media engage New Zealanders with political news?”

2011: Josh Hercus (Department of Politics, University of Otago): “Youth Voter Turnout in New Zealand: Perceptions and Attitudes of Student Non-Voters in the 2010 Local Body Elections

2010: Victoria Crockford (Victoria University of Wellington): “‘The Personal is Global’ – A feminist exploration of the gendered implications of the migration of aged-care workers in Aotearoa-New Zealand

2009: Joint winners Ashley Murchison (University of Otago): “Political Communication in New Zealand: A Study of Political Party Advertising in the 2008 General Election” and Margaret Joiner (University of Auckland) – “New Zealand First: parallels between the man and the party

NZPSA POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE PAPER PRIZE

Since 2007 a prize of $500 has been awarded for the best postgraduate paper at the NZPSA conference and from 2009 it has been awarded to a paper in any area of political studies other than Aotearoa/New Zealand domestic politics. An independent panel of judges will be appointed by the NZPSA President whose decision will be final. The prize is intended to be received by only one student, but it can be shared by one or more students on the recommendation of the panel.

To apply: 

Those interested need to provide via email an electronic file in word that includes the title of the paper, an abstract, paper and the author’s name and affliation, along with evidence that the paper has been accepted by the NZPSA Conference organisers. Please email these documents by Monday 19 October 2015 to the NZPSA President, vicki.spencer@otago.ac.nz.

Note that dissertations are not accepted. Papers should be presented at the conference in the year of submission, be approximately 6000 words and will not be accepted if they are over 8000 words excluding the abstract, references and tables. Papers can be co-authored with other students, but they must be fully the work of the student(s) making the submission: papers co-authored with supervisors or other staff members are excluded from consideration.

Winners:

2014: John Gray (National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago): “Help or Hindrance? Analyzing the impact of post-conflict security sector reform”

2013: Maria Tanyag (Discipline of Politics and International Relations, University of Auckland): “Beyond Pinays and Pills: Intersectionality, Coalitions and Policy Change.”

2012: Elvira Bobekova (University of Otago): “Rivers of Peace: The Role of Third Parties in Conflict Management of Transboundary River Disputes in Asia and Africa.”

2011: Amy Thomson (Massey University): “The ‘Dynamics of Contention’ in the Islamic Republic of Iran: Understanding the origins and failure of the 2009 Post-election Protests

2010: Joint winners Rosanna Keam (University of Auckland): “The contradiction of ‘Mining for poverty alleviation’ within a context of water scarcity: a case study of Namibia” and Nobuhiro Ihara (University of Melbourne): “Establishment of ASEAN as a Process of Reassurance by Indonesia

2009: No entries

2008: Kim Summersby (University of Auckland): “Does Māori Representation Matter?: Māori Substantive Political Representation in Practice

2007:  Joint winners: David Hall (Victoria University of Wellington): “An Inconvenient Obligation: How Governments Justify the Restriction of Asylum Seekers in Canada and Australia” and Rupert Mackintosh (Victoria University of Wellington): “Now or Later? New Zealand and Australian Climate Change’”

UNDERGRADUATE ESSAY PRIZE FOR AOTEAROA/NEW ZEALAND POLITICS

This prize originated in 2009 due to the generosity of Raymond Miller and from 2015 it will continue due to Janine Hayward’s generosity as the new editor of New Zealand Government and Politics (OUP). It is funded from the book’s royalties. A prize of $500 is awarded for the best undergraduate essay submitted as part of the requirements for a course on New Zealand domestic politics at 100-300 levels. One nomination per year can be made by a Course Convenor at any New Zealand University. It is expected that Course Convenors nominating an essay will take full precautions against any possible plagiarism.

The Convenor of the NZPSA New Zealand Politics Network will appoint a panel of judges including a representative from the University of Auckland as the administrator of the prize. When either Raymond Miller or Janine Hayward are available, they will be included as a member of the judging panel. The panel’s decision will be final. The prize is intended to be received by only one student, but it can be shared by one or more students on the recommendation of the panel.

To apply:

Course convenors need to send an electronic copy of the essay in word and an email with the student’s name, the convenor’s name and their affiliation, and the name, level and nature of the course it was submitted for by 5pm Friday 6 November 2015 to the Convenor of the Aotearoa/New Zealand Politics Network, Professor Jack Vowles: jack.vowles@vuw.ac.nz.

Winners:

2014: Kieran Gainsford (Discipline of Political Science and International Politics, University of Auckland), nominated by Victoria Woodman for his essay in Politics 352.

2013: Ellie Argyle (Victoria University of Wellington), nominated by her honours course convenor Stephen Levine, and a special Commendation for his first year essay to Abbas Nazir, nominated by his course convenor Bronwyn Hayward

2012: Nicholas Donaldson (University of Auckland)

2011: Rachael Chappell (University of Auckland)

2009: Lewis Mills (University of Auckland)

UNDERGRADUATE ESSAY PRIZE IN MAORI POLITICS

This new prize from 2015 in Māori Politics will be funded jointly to begin with by the NZPSA and the royalities from New Zealand Government and Politics (OUP) due to the generosity of Janine Hayward and Raymond Miller as the book’s current and past editors. As those royalities increase, Janine and Raymond have kindly agreed to take over full financial responsibility for the prize.

A prize of $500 will be awarded for the best undergraduate essay submitted as part of the requirements for a 100-300 level course at any New Zealand University. One nomination per year can be made by any Course Convenor. It is expected that Course Convenors nominating an essay will take full precautions against any possible plagiarism.

The NZPSA’s Māori Representative will appoint a panel of judges, whose decision will be final. The prize is intended to be received by only one student, but it can be shared by one or more students on the recommendation of the panel to the NZPSA President.

To apply:

Course convenors need to send an electronic copy of the essay in word and an email with the student’s name, the convenor’s name, his/her affiliation, and the name, level and nature of the course it was submitted for by 5pm Friday 6 November 2015 to the NZPSA’s Māori Representative, Associate Professor Dominic O’Sullivan: dosullivan@csu.edu.au.